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I don’t know if you noticed, but I drink a LOT of different kinds of wine. At any given time, I might have up to 10 bottles open so I can try a lot of options and pick out the best one to pair with a dessert. That’s a ton of wine open and I’m the only one in my house who drinks it. So what happens to all that wine?

It would be a shame to pour it all down the drain. Not only is that incredibly wasteful, it’s expensive! Fortunately, I have a wine preserver that allows me to open a bottle of wine, pour a glass, and then preserve it so it doesn’t oxidize and spoil.

After a bottle is opened, wine lasts anywhere from 1 day to a month depending on the type, before it starts tasting funky. The average is about 3-5 days- champagne lasts the least amount of time; fortified wines last the longest. The goal of a wine preserver is to slow down oxidation so the wine tastes and looks better longer. Just a cork put securely back in the bottle will help slow the oxidation process, and there are a number of wine preservers on the market that will keep wine fresh for several days. One of the more popular options is a pump that extracts oxygen from the bottle and seals it with a rubber cork. This option is great if you’re going to drink your wine within a week of opening, and the preservers are fairly easy to find.

But what if you don’t plan to drink your wine for several weeks, like often happens to me? In comes the Private Preserve to the rescue. This unassuming, lightweight can of inert gases can keep an open bottle of wine good for weeks, if not longer! Private Preserve dramatically slows the aging process through oxidation by forcing oxygen out of the bottle and replacing it with 3 inert gases- carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon. These gases are part of what we breathe naturally and are not harmful. Since I started using the Private Preserve, I’ve kept a bottle for up to a month and half. I opened it several times during that period and just re-preserved it each time.

Another great thing about the Private Preserve is that it’s inexpensive. You can get 2 bottles on Amazon for $15.99 right now- a total steal when you consider how much you’ll save in wine not poured down the drain. Each can lasts for 120 full uses.

My one and only complaint with the private preserve is the straw used to put the gases in the wine. There are two attached to the side of the can with tape, a set-up that I find a little odd. For one thing, this isn’t very sanitary as the straws are exposed to anything the can is near. Anyone who has dogs or cats knows they will like anything. Do you really want to risk your pet licking your straw? Ew! For another, the straws are easy to lose in this set-up! I wish they were permanently affixed with a mechanism to fold up and down as needed, or had some type of holder attached to the can.

So how do you use the Private Preserve? Simply insert the straw into the opening of the can and place the straw about halfway down the neck of the bottle. Then, set the cork on the straw so you can push it into the bottle as you withdraw the straw. Press the top of the can for one long burst and 3 short ones. Finally, withdraw the straw and insert the cork. It really is that easy! If you have white wine, go ahead and stick it back in the fridge, while red wine should be kept in a dark place so light does not affect it. When you’re ready to drink the wine, just pull out the cork like you normally would and pour yourself a glass! If you don’t want to finish the bottle then, go ahead and re-preserve it. I’ve done it successfully with as little as one glass left in the bottle.

I highly recommend trying this if you ever run into the choice of of having to either drink or trash a bottle of wine. While I was a little skeptical that something this inexpensive could work this well, it really is a serious game changer!

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